Delays

On the train this morning, I heard an announcement I’d never heard before, despite all the joyriding I’ve done on Link Light Rail. (It was spelled out on the LED board inside the train as well.) “Do not hold the doors open. Stand clear. Holding the doors open will delay the train.” The wording was firm, I thought, but it was somewhat diminished by that friendly “Doors to my right” voice.

I’m down to a single hour of overtime per day for most of this week. I started a half-hour early and left a half-hour late today. It was a much better day, pace-wise. I had time to take it slow this morning. I saw familiar faces on NWCN that I hadn’t seen in a while. I had time to wake Phillip up before I left. I had time to wait for the next Link train, rather than climbing into the first bus that arrived – although I didn’t have to wait long. Just as I got to the Westlake Station platform, the announcement came that the next train, southbound, would be arriving in two minutes.  I had time to take off my coat before I logged in this morning.

I came upon a terrific picture on the internet recently. It shows a monk meditating on a log near some water. The caption reads: “Relax. Nothing is under control.” I liked it so much that I printed it out and taped it to the wall of my cubicle. Now, if I can only follow it.

I commented to Phillip, this past weekend, that I’m impressed by how well the construction on Summit Avenue is coordinating with the route 47 buses. I told him there have been evenings when there has been a crane moving a steel plate, completely blocking the street, and it seems like the bus would be stuck. But as soon as the bus approaches, the crane moves over just enough for the bus to get through, and the flagger flags us through, with only a slight delay.

Things didn’t work out so well this evening. A piece of fencing was sticking out into the street (I assume to let some equipment in or out of the construction site) and a worker was tugging at the fence, trying to get it out of the street. The fence just wouldn’t budge. Our bus driver eventually opened the doors and let anyone exit who didn’t want to wait. I was close enough to home that I exited and walked the rest of the way. The construction crew has been doing such a good job coordinating with the buses that a stubborn fence is forgiven.

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