Creepy Map

During my morning break today, I read an article in Walking in Seattle about dangerous Seattle intersections. One of the intersections mentioned was Ravenna Ave NE & NE 54th Street. I couldn’t picture where that is, and the aerial photograph didn’t look familiar. So, I turned to Google Maps.

As I was typing in “ravena ave” the first thing the search bar autofilled was “Ravenna Ave NE and NE 54th Street”. How on earth did Google Maps anticipate what I was looking for? It’s not like it’s the only street that intersects Ravenna Avenue.

During my afternoon break today, I read an article in Capitol Hill Blog about a new pizza restaurant opening. It’s at the corner of Pine and Minor. I could picture where that is, especially from the photographs, but I decided to check Google Maps anyway.

As I was typing in “pine a” the first thing the search bar autofilled was “pine and minor”. How does Google Maps do that?

Actually, I can sort of understand why it would default to Ravenna and 54th. It is a busy intersection by a large park. But Pine and Minor is neither one – it’s hardly an intersection at all.

Is it simply that a lot of people were searching for these intersections today?

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4 thoughts on “Creepy Map

  1. Google utilizes some pretty sophisticated algorithms and I wonder if it also zooms in to your computer or phone and pulls out billions of data points from all the cookies that have been left behind by your other searches? But still, I concur about the eeriness.

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